The move has triggered criticism from several EU states worried about their economic relations with the listed states, notably Saudi Arabia. In spite of pressure to exclude Riyadh from the list, the commission decided to list the kingdom, confirming a Reuters report in January. The list now includes 23 jurisdictions; it previously comprised 16. The Commission also added Libya, Botswana, Ghana, Samoa, the Bahamas and the four U.S. territories of American Samoa, U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Guam. The other listed states are Afghanistan, North Korea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Syria, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia and Yemen. Bosnia Herzegovina, Guyana, Laos, Uganda and Vanuatu were removed. Apart from reputational damage, inclusion on the list complicated financial relations with the EU. The bloc’s banks would have to carry out additional checks on payments involving entities from listed jurisdictions. The 28 EU states now have one month, which can be extended to two, to endorse the list. They could reject it by qualified majority. EU justice commissioner Vera Jourova, who proposed the list, told a news conference she was confident states would not block the list. (Reuters/NAN)]]>

The Principles of Nigerian Environmental Law -- Order Your Copy Now!!! The Principles of Nigerian Environmental Law is a complete, comparative and international handbook on the fundamental principles governing the protection, conservation and sustainable utilization of the environment in Nigeria....Click to read more Written By Professor Damilola S. Olawuyi, LL.B (1st Class), BL (1st Class), LL.M (Calgary), LL.M (Harvard), DPhil (Oxford) Professor of Law and Director, OGEES Institute, Afe Babalola University, Ado Ekiti. For more information or to order your copies, please contact Mr. Keji Kolawole: [email protected] , Tel: +234 81 40000 988

Subscribe ToTheNigeriaLawyer News!